Adolescent Interventions

Adolescents are at such a stage of life where they are keen to understand themselves, eagerly explore interpersonal relationships and the world in general. It is a phase characterized not just by physical development but also psychological and sexual maturation leading to adolescents having many questions about life. This is the time they are confronted with the daily dilemma of witnessing values under pressure and making tough choices and taking difficult decisions.  

Keeping approach with young people rests on two critical factors – reflection and action. Adolescent interventions, in PRAVAH,  strives to create experiential spaces and journeys that empower adolescents to reflect and take rational decisions.

Programmes by Adolescent Intervention

  1. Friendship UdaNkhatola (FUN CAMP): Friendship UdaNkhatola (FUN) Camp’ is a powerful experiential learning journey from the self to the society which offers school students an insight into rural life through direct engagement with the rural community. It is a 5-6 day experiential camp in a rural setting (host organization) where inroads are made into understanding the perspective of the cultural and regional “other”, breaking stereotypes by asking powerful questions and establishing commonalities and interlinkages between different communities. It is a brilliant opportunity for school students to build friendships with rural adolescents by working in a team, challenging assumptions and addressing their fears and moving out of their comfort zones, thereby building connects with people from different contexts. These camps are organized usually in the month of March-June and September- December. The camps provide a huge learning opportunity for students where the learning’s range from deeper understanding of issues, learning new things about oneself, value of labour (cutting crops, drawing water from the well ) increase in confidence levels, making new friends to learning to express oneself. Adolescents spend their time in a rural set up and visit 2-3 villages and understand the various thematic aspects like governance, gender, livelihood, among others. At the end of this, a gathering is called wherein adolescents share their insights and learning with the larger community. As a token of appreciation and gratitude, the group of adolescents engages in Shram Sahayog (Labour of Love) in the rural community. This could include landscaping, planting trees, ploughing, cleaning and tending to local schools.  

Find below the location of places where these camps can be organized:

Host Organization Location Suitable months

 

Tarun Bharat Sangh (Alwar) Rajasthan October- December

March

ALPHA (near Udaipur) Rajasthan October- December

March

PRAVAH Retreat Centre (Majkhali, Ranikhet Uttarakhand

 

March-June

 

Barefoot college (Tilonia) Rajasthan September-November

March

Shri Bhubaneshwari Mahila Ashram (Tehri Garhwal) Uttarakhand April – June
Society for  Integrated Development of Himalayas (Mussoorie) Uttarakhand April- June

September- October

Shri Kaamdhenu Manav Sewa Trust (Una) Himachal Pradesh April- June

September October

GVNML Rajasthan March

September- December 

2. Curious Me!: Curious Me! is a 36 hour curriculum that enables and empowers school students to develop scientific thinking. Keeping in line with the vision of the National Policy of Education, 1986 and the National Curriculum Framework (both of which stresses on the need for inculcating scientific temperament and developing higher order thinking skills among students), the programme was conceptualized. The curriculum is designed to garner a space for curiosity and encourage the art of asking questions.

The programme provides for an excellent model to experiment, investigate and thereby learn in the process. A diverse range of action projects like conducting energy audits in the school, water conservation, anti bullying campaigns, waste management and renewal, among others were undertaken by students.

The programme has been successfully implemented with SR.DAV Public School (Dayanand Vihar), Indirapuram Public School (Ghaziabad), St Teresa’s Convent School (Ghaziabad), Prerna Centre, Father Agnel School (Delhi), Little Flower School (Jamshedpur), Kerala Samajan Model School (Jamshedpur)and reached out to 610 students and 34 educators. A diverse theme of action projects were picked up by students who engaged with them and aimed at initiating change in their schools. Issues ranged from energy conservation in the school to bullying , from waste management to improving the range of books in the library, from bus safety to discipline, among others.

3. Beyond Zebra: It is a learning and leadership journey for adolescents between the age of 15 and 17 years, that offers a “structured learning experience” for self-growth and “small tangible social change”  in an urban set up. It aims to create an interface between adolescents and some of Pravah’s partnering social change initiatives through an internship. This journey is based on enabling deeper engagements with psychosocial and economic issues that these partnering initiatives are working on, through the interns utilizing this platform to act on their concerns. The programme looks at internship as an investment on oneself from the point of view of emerging as an “inclusive leader” rather than from “changing the world” perspective.  

Being an inclusive leader would mean being a leader who is able to empathize with others, who is self-aware, who is able to balance out freedom with responsibility, one who can negotiate effectively, make informed decisions and more importantly inspire engagement from others through good communication skills. This program is an exciting opportunity especially for college bound students who are soon going to open themselves up to the world outside the comfort zone of their schools and families. Beyond Zebra allows the students to see a world different from the one that they may usually be a part of and gives an edge over other students when it comes to college applications. Such experiences enable them to gain multiple perspectives and the ability to work with different people and in different contexts at a very impressionable and crucial stage. This is also an opportunity for the organizations to reach out to young people and see how the depth of their work inspires a young person to be an informed, responsible and an active citizen. This mutual engagement between the intern and the organizations will create spaces for young minds to add value to the work of the partnering organizations through their zeal and fresh perspectives which may in turn open windows to newer avenues for all. This is an opportunity for the students to challenge, engage and understand these realities and apply their learning real-time to become inclusive leaders.

3. Beyond Zebra is a learning and leadership journey for adolescents between the age of 15 and 17 years, that offers a “structured learning experience” for self-growth and “small tangible social change”  in an urban set up. It aims to create an interface between adolescents and some of Pravah’s partnering social change initiatives through an internship. This journey is based on enabling deeper engagements with psychosocial and economic issues that these partnering initiatives are working on, through the interns utilizing this platform to act on their concerns. The programme looks at internship as an investment on oneself from the point of view of emerging as an “inclusive leader” rather than from “changing the world” perspective.  Being an inclusive leader would mean being a leader who is able to empathize with others, who is self-aware, who is able to balance out freedom with responsibility, one who can negotiate effectively, make informed decisions and more importantly inspire engagement from others through good communication skills.

This program is an exciting opportunity especially for college bound students who are soon going to open themselves up to the world outside the comfort zone of their schools and families. Beyond Zebra allows the students to see a world different from the one that they may usually be a part of and gives an edge over other students when it comes to college applications. Such experiences enable them to gain multiple perspectives and the ability to work with different people and in different contexts at a very impressionable and crucial stage. This is also an opportunity for the organizations to reach out to young people and see how the depth of their work inspires a young person to be an informed, responsible and an active citizen. This mutual engagement between the intern and the organizations will create spaces for young minds to add value to the work of the partnering organizations through their zeal and fresh perspectives which may in turn open windows to newer avenues for all. This is an opportunity for the students to challenge, engage and understand these realities and apply their learning real-time to become inclusive leaders.

4. Urban Community Exposure Visits: As the name suggests, one day community visit is a space designed for urban students to engage with urban resettlement communities, model villages, or urban slums. The visit focuses on understanding community life, local governance and issues of citizenship and identities. It also engages students to challenge stereotypes and understand social stratification better. Students are part of an experiential journey wherein they take part in a transact walk to understand the various social, economic and political aspects of the community followed by a consolidation and presentation of their learnings.One of the critical aspects of the intervention is “Community based group Action Project’ post the visit. Here, community’ is defined in its larger form where we consider it as:

 1) Inside school

2) Community near to school

3) Own community (colony, housing society etc.)

5. Safe School: Safe school intervention works with students to understand gender better and thereby co create and re-imagine their school as a safe space. The intervention aims to question the stereotyped gendered roles for both boys and girls, recognize how power difference emerging from gendered story leads to violence and the importance of building safe spaces in their institutions by conducting safety audits and thereby being able to conduct concrete action projects. Students engage in conducting safety audits and action plans based on re-imagined gender roles and submit recommendations to the schools.

 

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